Accessibility options

Switch to preferred accessibility theme:


Increase or decrease the text size:

  • Internet Explorer: View > Text Size > Largest

Keyboard navigation and access keys:

  • A - Accessibility options
  • 0 - Skip navigation
  • 1 - Home
  • 2 - Alexandrite chapters
  • 3 - Alexandrite directory
  • 4 - Alexandrite forums
  • 5 - Alexandrite gemstones
  • 6 - Alexandrite localities
  • 7 - Contact information
  • 8 - About Alexandrite Guide
  • 9 - Sitemap
  • Press ALT + Access Key, then ENTER.

Close

Alexandrite

Tsarstone collectors guide

Alexandrite guide forums

Page 1 of 1 10 results per page
Sort by: Most recent last
Alexandrite is a rare precious stone which is used in the manufacture of alexandrite jewelry like alexandrite rings, necklaces, pendants or bracelets. Alexandrite appraisal is not performed by the jewel manufacturer, but by qualified personnel and it looks at several aspects which are related to the stone: the way it reflects and bends light, the value, and the final use of the gemstone. To determine a crucial aspect of the gemstone (the thing that sets it apart from any other precious stone) is also necessary. Alexandrite appraisal must determine if the stone meets some standards. It is an evaluation upon these arguments:

1. The first step in alexandrite appraisal is the nature of the gemstone. It can be natural (mined from the earth) or produced synthetically in the laboratory. Of course, the most expensive one is the natural alexandrite.

2. Alexandrite is the only gem that has a color changing standard. The stone must change from green in daylight to rich ruby red or violet/purple in incandescent light or candlelight. Alexandrite appraisal must make sure that the alexandrite fits this description because the color of the stone is of uppermost importance. Alexandrite gemstones must meet a standard that implies they change their color 100%. The purer the stone is the more its value increases.

4. Alexandrite appraisal also takes into account clarity, a property of the gemstone that is associated with the degree of absence of inclusions. The norm for alexandrite is for it to have minor inclusions.

5. Another aspect that concerns alexandrite appraisal is the cut. Alexandrite is found in many shapes, but oval is the most commonly met form. A round cut raises the stone’s value considerably.

6. The final and most important phase of alexandrite appraisal is carat evaluation. One carat equals 200 milligrams. Carat combined with color, cut and clarity will determine the final price of the gemstone after the alexandrite appraisal.

One must understand that the gems themselves aren’t sold to the average buyer even if the alexandrite appraisal is valid. They must be used by the manufacturers to make alexandrite jewelry. When buying jewelry, the average customer has to understand that an alexandrite appraisal is highly recommended.

Keep in mind that working with jewelry does not make one a professional in alexandrite appraisal. Be careful and look out for scams or other deceits played by these so called alexandrite appraisal experts. Scams usually work by using you as the main player in their game. The so called alexandrite appraisal expert tries to give you a low value for your gemstone or jewelry and does a superficial alexandrite appraisal while his accomplices try to buy them from you. They usually make it look like they’re doing you a favor. Be aware of such scams and always look for the certificate of recognition that proves a person qualified.

Most jewelry buyers consider they know pretty much about the products they are interested in, but without a professional alexandrite appraisal they don’t have any safety or certainty.

Nooten-Boom@
I've noticed some very nice round-cut Alexandrites over 1 carat on this site. I found a 1.6 round-cut Alexandrite from a reputable jeweler. The stone is natural, eye-clean, with good color change blue/green to red/purple (similar to the round stones posted on this site). The retail price is approximately $20,000!! I was very surprised, to say the least. Can this be right?? Can anyone shed some light, and what is the markup on these things??

michael beal
Color-change is determined by counting the number of facets that change color in the stone when looking down through the table of the gem. The GIA labels these changes by using the terminology of Weak (considered color-change crysoberyl), Medium, Medium-Strong, Strong, Very-Strong. Other labs and several international governmental agencies use a numerical grading which is determined by the percentage of facets changing color. These conditions are performed scientifically but the reading of them is subjective. Therefore, color-change strength may be rated differently by different gemologists

Rita
We have an old ring that is approximately 3-4 carts, round cut set in 18k gold. The jeweler we took it to told us it was an alexandrite. The color changes from dark purple to deep green. I am not sure if it is a genuine natural stone or lab created - my guess would be lab or simulated since it is so large. Can you give me an idea on the approximate value of this stone/ring ?
QUOTE
I've noticed some very nice round-cut Alexandrites over 1 carat on this site. I found a 1.6 round-cut Alexandrite from a reputable jeweler. The stone is natural, eye-clean, with good color change blue/green to red/purple (similar to the round stones posted on this site). The retail price is approximately $20,000!! I was very surprised, to say the least. Can this be right?? Can anyone shed some light, and what is the markup on these things??
Clean and round alexandrites with a strong color change are extremely rare. I could imagine a retail price of $20,000 for a high quality stone because that shape is so hard to find in alexandrite. If you are working with a high end jeweler in a retail location, that price would also reflect the high overheads associated with that kind of a business. If you can live with an oval, you will find a much better selection and much more attractive pricing. Try Multicolour.com for a good selection of alexandrites at more affordable prices, at http://www.multicolour.com/gallery/?/gallery/alexandrite/
Simon Dawew CII
QUOTE
I've noticed some very nice round-cut Alexandrites over 1 carat on this site. I found a 1.6 round-cut Alexandrite from a reputable jeweler. The stone is natural, eye-clean, with good color change blue/green to red/purple (similar to the round stones posted on this site).
Jeweller's standard retail markup is about 4.5, so you probably can get this gemstone for about 4.000-5.000 USD. And if you are serious about buying an alexandrite jewelry, I will recommend to buy loose alexandrite gemstone with certificate and then ask a jeweller to set it for you or better made custom design unique ring.

A.V.K
Round alexandrites especially in larger sizes are extremely rare. A real nice 1.60ct. stone could retail for $20,000. There isn't much production of alexandrite anywhere right now so prices have been rising. Try www.multicolour.com for better alexandrite prices.
I would like to add to discussion that anyone would have about alexandrites, especially the russian ones. If you have or suspect you have an alexandrite, be careful who you take it to. A reputable gemologist who is willing to put it through the battery of tests not just look at it is who you want to seek out. If the gemologist picks it up looks at it and then hands it back and says nope its synthetic, get your self out of there as fast as you can. They cannot and i repeat cannot be checked that way. Also about the synthetic ones. Sure they made sythentic stones in the late 1890's but they were microscopic in size. It wasnt until around 1902 that they were made about the size of the head of a pin. And it was a ruby to boot. Synthetic alexandrites were made in around the 1960's bya company called CHATTAM. I would like to find serious people who are interested in dicussing alexandrites. My favorite is the siberian one. as it is usually eye clean and very nice to look at. contact me at lindasilljer@hotmail.com

linda silljer
Topic page 1 of 1
1
Enter up to 5 e-mail addresses separated by commas
Please help us to prevent automated requests by entering the code shown in the picture box. Can´t read this image? Get new verification code
Close options details